Posts Tagged ‘midcoast Maine’

Cellardoor Winery pairs wine with food this spring

February 23, 2010

Taste your way through Maine without leaving the Midcoast. Maine’s Cellardoor Winery, with locations in Lincolnville and Rockport, is hosting wine-and-food pairings every weekend, May 2 through July 25; Saturdays in Rockport, Sundays in Lincolnville. Pairings include Maine cheeses and chocolates, as well as selections from local markets. The detailed schedule is available here.

VOTE now, vote often for Rockland! Named a “2010 Distinctive Destination,” make it THE destination

February 3, 2010

Planning a Maine vacation? Want to have an authentic experience? Want lobster, a seaport, great museums and shops? Craving a real town, not a tourist set?

Have I got the place for you.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation has named Rockland, Maine, to its 2010 List of America’s Dozen Distinctive Destinations. Rockland was selected for its authentic preservation of a rich history and its wide range of unique attractions, including a picturesque working waterfront that packs alluring cultural heritage with prized fresh seafood and world famous festivals.

For the first time in the program’s history, the public can vote online for its fan favorite throughout February. Any legal resident of the U.S., 18 years of age or older, can vote as often as they like for their favorite city or town on this year’s list. The winner of the popular vote will be announced on March 1, 2010. You’ll have to register, but it’s well worth the effort. Voters are automatically entered to win a complimentary two night stay at any Historic Hotel of America.

So why vote for Rockland? Well, besides it being home of Pies on Parade, the Lobster Festival, fun shops, and cool museums and galleries and, well, I could go on and on, but I’ll let the National Trust get a few words in:

“With great pride in its maritime past and present, Rockland blends tradition with an innovative spirit,” said Richard Moe, president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. “Visitors will discover an authentic snapshot of coastal living.”

Lobster is king in Rockland – from the harbor where visitors can watch a lobsterman dock to the world-famous Maine Lobster Festival, which occurs in August every year. Locals and visitors can shop and enjoy a bounty of local cuisines in a setting one block from the harbor on Rockland’s historic Main Street. Home to art galleries and a number of major events, the town hosts visitors with the North American Blues Festival in July, which includes two days of Grammy Award-winning music on the harbor, and the Maine Boats Homes & Harbors Show in August.

Highlights from the Trust:

Maine Lighthouse Museum educates the public on the history of American lighthouses and the role of the United States Coast Guard in maritime safety

• The historic Owl’s Head, Rockland Breakwater, and Marshall Point lighthouses still stand in the Rockland area and are open for tours.

• For 63 years the Maine Lobster Festival has celebrated Maine’s maritime tradition with over 1,000 community volunteers and 20,000 pounds of lobster

Rockland Harbor provides great opportunities for sailing and kayaking just off the coast of Maine.

The Strand Theatre offers film, live music, and stage performances and has been entertaining Rockland residents and visitors since 1923.

Farnsworth Art Museum houses a nationally recognized collection of works from many of America’s greatest artists including the work of three generations of the Wyeth family as well as the Farnsworth Homestead and the Olson House (made famous by Andrew Wyeth’s iconic painting, Christina’s World), both listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

And they didn’t even mention the Puffin Center, the National Historic District, the easily walkable downtown, the great inns, the restaurants that are gaining national attention, and, well you know me, I could go on and on.

So, what are you waiting for? Vote now, vote often!

A peek at the Limerock Inn

January 31, 2010

During Rockland’s Pies on Parade event earlier this month, I stayed at the Limerock Inn, a wonderful B&B (and member of the Historic Inns of Rockland) just a couple of blocks from Main Street. Now I’ve always had a bit of a soft spot for this inn, as it was created by friends back in Rockland’s gray days, the era when it was  better known as a rough-and-tumble fishing community, rather than the arts, dining, and shopping destination it is today.

The house is a standout, an 1890’s Queen Anne painted lady, complete with wrap-around porch, listed on the National Historic Register. The woodwork alone is exquisite. Each of the eight rooms has its own distinctive flavor, from the turret room with a lovely wedding canopy bed to the Cottage Room, a private oasis with its own door opening to the backyard gardens. Some have whirlpool tubs and/or a fireplace, and there’s Wifi throughout. Currently no inroom TVs (although flat-screens are in the future), but there’s one concealed with the living room armoire.

The furnishings  are top of the line, reflecting two of the original four owners (two couples) business; they owned a furniture store. They bought quality, but made sure it was in keeping with the period and decor, and the emphasis is on comfort. Let me tell ya, those leather chairs with ottomans in the living room invite relaxation, perhaps with a selection from the library of good reads positioned within grasp.

Frank and PJ, the current owner/innkeepers, are naturals, and Frank is the creative cook who whips up more-than-filling breakfasts. If you’re really fortunate, there might be a serving of his Key Limerock pie available—trust me, he nailed it (and his granola crust seals the deal).The self-serve pantry assures that those who crave a midnight snack will find one.

These guys love Rockland, so they’re a wonderful source of info for first-timers to the region, and the inn provides enough privacy (including individual dining tables) that it’s a good choice for newbies to the B&B experience. One night here, and you’ll be booking again and again.